decline thesis abolition debate

seeking to identify the factors which prevented the Ottomans from achieving "modernization" turned to the stereotypes which formed the basis of the decline thesis: an Ottoman penchant for despotism and lethargy which inhibited their entry into the modern world and brought about economic stagnation. "The Arabic-speaking world in the Ottoman period: A socio-political analysis". New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2013. Workers were guided by their genuine empathy for West Indian slaves, formed out of their own experiences as wage labourers.

However much debate has ensued as to the defining factor which caused its. Firstly there is the Eric Williams Decline Thesis found in his work Capitalism. The Decline Thesis of British Slavery since Econocide (1986). Slavery and Abolition, 7(1) (May 1986.

In some cases this is due to the continued reliance by non-specialists on outdated and debunked works, 8 and in others to certain political interests benefiting from the continued perpetuation of the decline narrative. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1987. Eric Williams, Capitalism and Slavery (1944, reptd, 1966 hereafter,. The Role of Ideology, in rejecting the decline thesis, scholars were tasked with making sense of why the trade was abolished if it was such an economically irrational decision. The West Indian Economy and the Abolition of the British Slave Trade, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Vol. Cemal Kafadar, "The Myth of the Golden Age: Ottoman Historical Consciousness in the post-Süleymanic Era in Süleyman the Second sic and His Time, eds. Tezcan, Second Ottoman Empire,. Approaching Ottoman History: An Introduction to the Sources.

decline thesis abolition debate